La méthode algérienne?


Meddi_democrate

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Hier, et suite à la tuerie de Nice en France, un journaliste algérien, rédacteur en chef de l’édition du week-end d’El Watan, a publié le statut ci-contre sur son compte Facebook. Il y fait l’apologie d’une certaine méthode algérienne de lutte contre le terrorisme et dit son soutien à 200% à Athmane Tartag qui a dirigé le CPMI lors de la décennie noire et qui a toujours un rôle important dans l’appareil du pouvoir du quatrième mandat. J’ai réagi à ce message sur Twitter comme l’ont fait d’autres TwittoDZ. Il s’en est trouvé aussi pour le soutenir.

Mais j’ai tendance, du fait de mon impatience, à limiter mes réactions sur Twitter pour ne pas m’étaler sur N tweets (limitation à 140 caractères par tweet). Et c’est pour celà que je fais ce post. Continue reading

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Book Review: Chants de Guerre des Femmes Kabyles


Unwritten languages face many threats. They could of course disappear, and when they have people trying to save them, as it is the case with Kabyle, they still face the threat of losing all or part of the cultural patrimony they carry.

Some Kabyles nowadays speak in French or Algerian dardja, and many do speak Kabyle but mixed with so many Arabic or French words that you wouldn’t recognise it. Several Kabyle words are therefore not used any more.

But it is not just words that disappear. Poems and proverbs tend to be forgotten as well. A great-aunt of mine, aged 103, lost her 16 yo and 18 yo sons who died as martyrs in the early days of the Algerian Revolution. I think she never recovered from her loss and she used to sing many poems dedicated to them and to the war in general. Unfortunately nobody did learn or record them, and they will probably disappear the time she will leave us. Continue reading

Repatriation of Algerian detainees in Guantanamo: an american perspective


One of our American readers has sent me this piece which he wrote on the subject of the repatriation of Abdul Aziz Naji to Algeria after his detention in Guantanamo by the US under suspiscion of terrorism-linked activities. El Khabar has today published an article about Naji, where the latter recounts the horrors he has seen in Guantanamo and denounces it as a violation of human rights from the comfort of his home in Batna (click here for an English summary). Only last week, he was denouncing Algeria for its human rights abuses but this time from the discomfort of Guantanamo,  still, he stated that he’d rather stay in Guantanamo than be sent back to Algeria for fear of torture.

Below, I am reproducing Jake’s article as was sent to me and it would be interesting to have a discussion around this issue and in particular, from an Algerian perspective:

On July 24, the New York Times posted an editorial about the forced repatriation of Abdul Aziz Naji that condemns both the United States and Algeria in the handling of former detainees, but from my point of view, as a young American interested in Algerian society and in international human rights, the Times didn’t go far enough in criticizing both nations.

The decision to send Naji back to Algeria represents a fundamental change in Continue reading

The Mediterranean sea changes words meanings


Two days ago, France commemorated the anniversary of “the appeal of June 18“. On this day in 1940, Charles de Gaulle used the BBC waves to call the French people to resist the Nazi occupation. A few years later, the West (mainly the USA and the UK) and the former French colonies freed France. This year, Sarkozy decided to celebrate this event in the UK, and asked his PM and members of his party to pay the annual visit to de Gaulle’s grave.

Having lived under the occupation, many thought that France would understand the situation of its own colonized lands and people, and do something for them (at least to thank them for helping free her). But they were naïve for France wanted to recover its reputation as an international power, and what a better way to do it than reminding all those lowly colonized people that they are nothing but the servants of their French masters. The massacres of May 8, 1945 were the message France decided to deliver to its Algerian colony.

Luckily (and unfortunately for colonialist France), these bloody massacres led to the opposite result as they triggered the actions towards our War of Independence. And France had to face a military resistance which it had not expected and which caused the loss of its most celebrated colony.

Continue reading