Pour Nihal


Two weeks ago, Nihal Si Mohand, a little girl from the Ait-Abdelouahab village in Tizi-Ouzou, disappeared and couldn’t be found after several days spent by the population and gendarmerie looking for her. Until yesterday as the the gendarmerie unfortunately confirmed her death after they ran DNA tests on human remains they found earlier. May she rest in peace.

Nihal can now be added to an already long list of child abduction/murder victims, some of whom have been found alive or dead while others’ fate is still unknown. This new episode, followed by many Algerians, stirred up many reactions on social networks and also by so-called journalists in the media, many of which were indecent.

Below is a contribution by our regular anonymous reader who wrote this post a few months ago.

Paix à son âme, et paix aux âmes de tous les autres.

Nihal s’en est allée. Arrachée cruellement à la vie et à ses parents. Si je pouvais les consoler, je leur dirai qu’elle a déjà tout oublié, là où elle est. Qu’elle affiche encore son si beau sourire. Mais ses parents sont inconsolables. Leur douleur Continue reading

Je Suis Mnarvie


This text is a contribution by an Algerian friend of PoF who kindly agreed to share some of her thoughts around today’s (and yesterday’s) preferred targets when feminism is projected on Muslim women and societies.
Happy reading!

Oui vous avez bien lu, il y a effectivement un E à Mnarvi.

Je vous rassure tout de suite, c’est ponctuel. Le temps d’un post seulement.

Merci à Mnarvi, le vrai, pour l’invitation 🙂

Avec tous ces : Je Suis Ceci, Je Suis Cela, j’avais moi aussi envie d’être quelque chose. Comme tout le monde. De créer un #hashtag. D’être solidaire avec Mnarvi pourquoi pas ? Il y a tellement de choses qui se passent et qui sont causes d’énervement… Et comme je suis une femme : pas question de m’énerver sans un E ! Il parait d’ailleurs que l’une des grandes victoires du féminisme est celle d’avoir obtenu la féminisation du langage. Comme d’avoir ajouté un E à “écrivain” par exemple, ou bien à “auteur”. Dérisoire ? Et pourtant c’est bien une victoire pour certaines. Nous parlons du français, parce qu’en arabe il y a bien longtemps que le problème est résolu. Le Ta Marboutta est là pour ça ة . Oui, j’aurais pu écrire Je Suis Mnarvia et Continue reading

Book Review: Avec tes mains


Lhyza Libertad reviews a book she read and, I believe, liked. I had never heard of this author before so thanks Lhyza for letting us (me) know about him and for your contribution to Patriots on Fire.
As this is (only) the second guest-post we’ve got on the blog, I take this opportunity to remind our readers that the blog is open to all guest-posts on topics related in a way or another to Algeria.

Here is Lhyza’s text.

avec tes mainsIn August 2013 I went on a trip to France and my last stop was in Paris. You know this town, that people either love for its romanticism or hate for its rudeness. This town, which has thousands of streets filled with book shops. As a book lover I spent almost all my free time in these book shops if I was not meeting my friend Ingrid or watching a film with my hosts near Telegraphe in the 19ème. My hosts were really artistic and open-minded, they recommended me to go to the Arab World Institute to see an interesting exhibition there. Of course I followed their recommendation and went there. As in all museums or exhibition centres you have a book shop with various objects that they also sell, as souvenirs you know.

I am coming to the point. Be patient. Continue reading

Repatriation of Algerian detainees in Guantanamo: an american perspective


One of our American readers has sent me this piece which he wrote on the subject of the repatriation of Abdul Aziz Naji to Algeria after his detention in Guantanamo by the US under suspiscion of terrorism-linked activities. El Khabar has today published an article about Naji, where the latter recounts the horrors he has seen in Guantanamo and denounces it as a violation of human rights from the comfort of his home in Batna (click here for an English summary). Only last week, he was denouncing Algeria for its human rights abuses but this time from the discomfort of Guantanamo,  still, he stated that he’d rather stay in Guantanamo than be sent back to Algeria for fear of torture.

Below, I am reproducing Jake’s article as was sent to me and it would be interesting to have a discussion around this issue and in particular, from an Algerian perspective:

On July 24, the New York Times posted an editorial about the forced repatriation of Abdul Aziz Naji that condemns both the United States and Algeria in the handling of former detainees, but from my point of view, as a young American interested in Algerian society and in international human rights, the Times didn’t go far enough in criticizing both nations.

The decision to send Naji back to Algeria represents a fundamental change in Continue reading